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NativeAdVantage 10-Q2BA:

(10 Questions 2B Answered)

What do you do best?
What makes you the best?
Biggest success?
What are your aspirations?
Most challenging moment?
Favorite Motto?
Favorite People?
Favorite Places?
Favorite Products?
Current Passions?


Featured NativeAdVantage:

Andy Weir: Author of "The Martian"

John Philipson: VP, Six Senses Resorts

Tom Sito: Chair of Animation, USC Film School

Elizabeth Wynn: Broker, Sotheby's RE

Leonard Greenhalgh: Professor, Tuck-Darmouth)

Ryan Blair: NY Times Best Selling Author/Entrepreneur

 

Featured NativeAdVice:

Shai Reshef: Founder of University of the People

Paul D'Arcy: SVP of Indeed

Susan Hatje: GM of Mandarin Oriental, NY

Dan Laufer: Co-Founder of RentLingo

Hilary Laney: President of Tri-Digital

Greg Marsh: Co-Founder of onefinestay

Omar Qari: Co-Founder of Abacus

Gabriell Weinberg: Founder of DuckDuckGo

Stacy Rauen: E-I-C of Hospitality Design Mag

Jon Gray: CRO of HomeAway

Joe Speiser: Co-Founder of LittleThings.com

Ben McKean: Co-Founder of HungryRoot

John Boiler: Founder/CEO of 72andSunny

Wayne Pacelle: CEO of The Humane Society of the US

Tom Guay: GM at The Sagamore Resort

Dr. Alejandro Junger: Founder of The Clean Program

Rob Flaherty: CEO of Ketchum

Neil Thanedar: Founder/CEO of LabDoor

Andy Grinsfelder: VP of Sales/Marketing, Delaware North Resorts

Laura Frerer-Schmidt: VP/Publisher of Women's Health

Avi Steinlauf: CEO of Edmunds.com

Kathy Bloomgarden: CEO of Ruder Finn

Gabriel Flateman: Co-Founder/CTO of Casper

Mark Bartels: CEO of StumbleUpon

Bill Hagelstein: President/CEO of RPA

Adam Singolda: Founder/CEO of Taboola

Jonathan Plutzik: Proprietor of The Betsy-South Beach

Jessica Scorpio: Founder/VP of Marketing at GetAround

Ralph McRae: CEO of Leading Brands

Warren Berger: Bestselling Author

Liz Kaplow: Founder/CEO of Kaplow Communications

Dave Girouard: Founder/CEO of UpStart

Dave Asprey: Founder of BullectProof Executive

Douglas C. Smith: President of EDSA

Val Difebo: CEO of Deutsch NY

Guido Polito: CEO of Baglioni Hotels

Doyle Graham, Jr.: CEO of Valencia Group

Oscar Farinetti: Founder of Eataly

Angelo Sotira: CEO of DeviantART

Ali Khwaja: CFO of Safecharge

Zach Erdem: Proprietor of 75 Main

Jim Beley: GM of The Umstead Hotel

Alexis Gelburd-Kimler: Proprietor of West Bridge

Elie Georges: Proprietor of Hotel San Regis

Kalen Caughey: Founder o VOKE Tab

Michael Friedenberg: CEO of IDG

Donna Karan: Founder of DKNY

Edward Nardoza: Editor-in-Chief of WWD

Scott Dadich: Editor-in-Chief of Wired

Rhona Murphy: Former CEO of The Daily Beast

David J. Pecker: CEO of American Media

Lilian Roten: VP of Swissotel Hotels

Kenny Dichter: Founder/CEO of Wheels Up

Joshua Tetrick: Founder/CEO of Hampton Creek

Paul James: Global Brand Leader of The Luxury Collection

Dr. James Wagner: President of Emory University

Amy Thompson: President of ATM Artists & Management

Neil Gillis: President of Round Hill Music

Brett Matteson: President of Columbia Hospitality

Jonathan Reckford: CEO of Habitat For Humanity

Phil Harrison: President/CEO of Perkins+Will

Chef Bill Telepan

Tony Horton: Founder of P90X

Beth Weissenberger: Co-Founder of The Handel Group

Michael Fertik: Founder/CEO of Reputation.com

Dana Cowin: Editor-in-Chief of Food & Wine

Bob Proctor: Chairman of Proctor/Gallagher Institute

Dennis Turcinovic: Owner of Delmonicos

Vittorio Assaf: Co-Founder of Serafina Restaurant Group

Shafqat Islam: Co-Founder of Newscred

Matt Williams: CEO of The Martin Agency

Bruce Rogers: Executive Chef at Hale & Hearty

Caleb Merkl: Co-Founder of Maple

Candy Argondizza: VP of Culinary at ICC

Neil Sazant: President of The Sagamore

Matt Straz: Founder/CEO of Namely

Terry Couglin: Managing Partner of Marta/Maialino

Andrei Cherny: Co-Founder/CEO of Aspiration

Ronen Nissenbaum: Managing Director of Waldorf Astoria NY

Patrick Godfrey: President of Godfrey Q

Sarah Berman: Founder/President of The Berman Group

Michael Schwartz: Owner of Genuine Hospitality Group

Stephan Aarstol: Founder/CEO of Tower Paddle Boards

Peter Shaindlin: COO of Halekulani Corp.

August Cardona: Founder/CEO of Epicurean Group

Nick Kenner: Co-Founder of Just Salad

TIM WESTERGREN: FOUNDER OF PANDORA RADIO

How did you get into the industry?

I fell in love with music early. I began playing blues piano at 8, then jazz, then started composing and eventually found my way into the recording studio.  After studying theory, composition and recording technology in college, I spent years as a working musician; practicing hours every day, playing bands, clubs, hotel lounges.  The whole gamut. Eventually I found my way to film composing which inspired the Music Genome Project, and my decision to found Pandora. That was 15 years ago.

MICHAEL FRIEDENBERG: CEO OF IDG COMMUNICATIONS WORLDWIDE

Any emerging industry trends?

Specific to business technology, I think we are living our very own Industrial Revolution. The mobile, social, data-driven Web is causing every business, job function, and individual to rapidly transform. In the media world,  digital display is becoming the new print. With  viewability, fraud, ad blockers and the efficiency found in programmatic, media companies will once again need to shift their reliance from display to other audience based revenue streams like native, video, content, mobile, social, and demand generation in order to grow profitable revenues. In addition, we see that marketers are increasingly drawn to scale and global reach as they look across borders for new customers and revenue.

JACK DANGERMOND: CO-FOUNDER & PRESIDENT, ESRI

Any industry opportunities or challenges?

Organizations must balance internal needs for productivity and achieving goals with the interests of customers and community stakeholders. Making better decisions often requires using data that resides in different systems, different departments, different organizations, and, often, in different formats. The opportunity we have is to support them with a platform that allows them to integrate disparate data, analyze it quickly, and provide insight on decision alternatives and the broad impacts of each. When impacts are visualized in a geographic context, they are easy to understand and communicate. The unique ability of the ArcGIS platform to consume information from disparate systems of record and assess and analyze the data to provide powerful insight into issues and engage stakeholders is powerful. Government and organizations face very tough challenges, and the increasing need to make smart decisions that consider all of the variables and impacts will continue to drive the demand for GIS technology.

JIMMY WALES, FOUNDER OF WIKIPEDIA

Inspiration for the business idea, and your vision for the Business?

I was watching the growth of the free software movement, or open source software as many people call it, and I saw programmers coming together to create all the really great software that runs the Internet using free licenses and collaborative techniques.  GNU/Linux, Apache, Perl, PHP, MySQL - all of these technologies and more were created mainly by volunteers sharing their work freely online. I realized that this kind of collaboration naturally started with programmers (because they could create the tools they needed for sharing their work) but that the concept could be extended to all kinds of cultural works.  Hence, the idea for Wikipedia. 

BILL WALSHE: CEO OF VICEROY HOTEL GROUP

What's next for the Business in the near future?

Doubling the size of our company in the next 5 years.In the past year, we’ve introduced the 'I Am Viceroy' campaign that connects our customer to experiences that will allow them to create memories that will last a lifetime. Our video to launch ‘I am Viceroy' played in-flight across Virgin America for the month of November 2014 which created huge visibility. In April of this year, we announced our strategic partnership with the Global Hotel Alliance which gives us the opportunity to speak to customers of like-minded brands across the globe.

DONNA KARAN: FOUNDER OF DKNY

Your key initiatives for the success of the Business?

There have been many, many. When we opened Donna Karan New York in 1984, we designed and offered a head-to-toe wardrobe – a new concept for its time. For DKNY, we did the same thing, seeking out partnerships that would complete our lifestyle message.  We have everything from menswear and a separate and complete jeans company to accessories like hosiery, watches, swim, sleepwear, eyewear and home. Sometimes we source it ourselves, other times we partner with an expert in the field, as we did with Estee Lauder for our fragrances. Social media and e-commerce is everything right now. You have to be plugged in to be heard. Personally, I love it. I love the intimacy of being able to reach someone when they’re in their home or office – when they have time to truly pay attention. I don’t think e-commerce can ever replace the store experience, but it gives us all options we never had before. Fashion-wise, I’m not a trend-chaser and never have been.

SHANNON O'NEILL: PRESIDENT OF TRAVEL CHANNEL

Your most difficult moment at the Business? (and what did you learn?)

I co-founded a .com startup in the late 90’s. In late 2001, we made the very difficult decision to shut down the company and layoff our staff. What began as the most exciting work experience, turned into the most disappointing. But I learned so much from the experience, all of which has helped me be successful today. What also makes me happy is that my co-founder and all of our key employees have all gone on to great success, so we all learned and applied to our future decisions.  

ANDY POLANSKY: CEO OF WEBER SHANDWICK

Ideal experience for a customer/client?

We consider our clients as partners in every sense of the word. We go beyond providing communications counsel to think deeply about how we can provide solutions for our clients’ businesses. We make sure we understand their businesses inside and out; that we bring our best talent from across geographies, practices and areas of expertise to collaborate and generate the best, most creative ideas. 

MIKE PERLIS, PRESIDENT & CEO OF FORBES

How do you motivate others?

With a firm, well-defined and communicated strategy that is executed honestly and transparently.

MILES YOUNG: WORLDWIDE CHAIRMAN/CEO, OGILVY & MATHER

Career advice to those in your industry?

To someone entering the Advertising field, my advice is to listen, listen, listen.  I think quite often in our business you feel you have to talk, talk, talk.  In fact, it’s the exact opposite. You have to show humility and very patiently absorb as much as you possibly can.  Be very sure of your ground before you start to opine on stuff.  The more you listen, the more you understand the creative people and how they function, the client and how they function. In my mind, listening skills are the most important skills to acquire.  They are really not taught in university, and they are certainly not taught by people training you for interviews because you are told to talk and to project yourself. You are not taught to listen at all.  So getting yourself out of that mindset is really important.

SUSAN GIANINNO: CHAIRMAN, NORTH AMERICA OF PUBLICIS WORLDWIDE

Career advice to those in your industry?

I have had the opportunity to mentor many aspiring entrepreneurs.  My advice to them is consistent.  Stay focused on an overriding mission or purpose.  Let that purpose be your guiding and enduring principle.  Once you know your purpose, then make sure you have two key components to success: the right capabilities; and, support from all critical stakeholders.  Also, be prepared to face the “miserable middle,” when everything seems to be losing steam and where you inevitably begin to question yourself.  Don’t give up at this stage.  Everyone faces this.  How you get through this miserable middle is what makes the difference between flash in the pan and a sustainable enterprise.  It usually requires reinventing your capabilities and engaging new support.  It should NOT lead you to change your purpose and mission.  Your commitment and passion for the purpose and mission is what will ultimately sustain you.

FRED DEVITO: CO-FOUNDER, EXHALE

Career advice to those in your industry?

Follow your dream and take each hurdle one at a time.  Don’t look too far ahead and always understand that your time in front of your customer is the most important interactions of your day.  Be present with them, give them your full and undivided attention and watch your business grow one guest at a time.  Word of mouth, referrals and reputation are everything in building a business.

RICHARD S. LEVICK, ESQ. CHAIRMAN & CEO, LEVICK

Career advice to those in your industry?

Think like the client. Don’t just build a great website. Build a web site that will sell your client’s widgets. Don’t just write a nice press release. Build a campaign that changes minds. Great execution beats great strategy every day. Stop talking and start doing. You can be great at one thing: pitching stories to the media, managing social media campaigns, event planning, whatever. Such expertise ensures that you’ll probably always have a job. But for real career success, to really make a contribution, you need a holistic mindset. You need to see your client company as that company’s CEO sees it: as concerned about compliance programs as you are about their website, as knowledgeable about how and why pending legislation will affect their business as you are about the features of their products and services.

RUDOLF MOLKENBOER: CEO OF ING AMERICAS

Career advice to those in your industry?

Empowering people to set high goals, and then giving them the tools they need to succeed is very important. Hold people to high standards, and I find that they exceed even their own expectations more often than not. Creating a true partnership with your clients to deliver the innovative products they need for their most complex financing challenges. This is not an easy undertaking but one ING has accomplished through fostering a culture of people working together, globally, to share knowledge freely with our colleagues and clients. We have worked very hard to create an environment where people feel empowered to come up with ideas without being prompted and are not shy to take initiative and risks. The result is an ING that is always the most relevant partner to our clients.

CATHIE BLACK: FORMER CHAIRMAN AND PRESIDENT, HEARST MAGAZINE

Career advice to those in your industry?

One of the traits that I believe is most important in the media industry is curiosity. You have to be curious about trends, happenings, change and the future. I have always been comfortable in looking at the future as the past is not always the best predictor. It is why I have not been afraid of taking a risk, albeit hopefully a calculated one.

CHRIS SALGARDO: CEO OF KIEHL'S USA

Career advice to those in your industry?

You can’t be great at everything, but you have to be good at a lot of things. You have to have a vision, you have to know where you’re going, and you have to set that strategy, because without that, your team won’t march to the right beat. Your team also wants to be treated with respect. They’re more concerned with work-life balance than ever, and I believe that if you run an efficient organization, and are involved in every department—nothing’s too small—you can build a highly effective team. Everyone can be successful, everyone can play a part, but everyone can leave on time. A successful CEO is operationally sound and really understands the business. It all starts with the leader setting the tone for everybody else.

EDWARD NARDOZA: EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF WWD

Career advice to those in your industry?

My advice for the next generation of editors would be to stay as current as possible with new communication and distribution platforms but never lose sight of your core ethics. Sound, credible journalism with an unshakable core of integrity will win out in the end over the solipsism that permeates much of the new media. Do your own legwork and don't try to piggyback on someone else's labor. Even though an  "aggregation" model might seem low-cost and comprehensive, there's no substitute for original journalism. Especially if you're driven by the one quality essential to any great editor or reporter: curiosity. Why would you want to ride someone else's wave? Do the story yourself. And don't lose sight of the fact that print is still alive and, in my opinion, has a distinct future that plays to fixity, context and editorial judgment.

TRISTAN WALKER: FOUNDER/CEO OF WALKER & COMPANY

Career advice to those in your industry?

The trials you go through as an entrepreneur and the blessings you receive are the same things.
Those trials are simply lessons for entrepreneurs to learn from and we should all be thankful we can be afforded the opportunity to go through those to be even stronger leaders.

BERTHA GONZÁLEZ NIEVES: CEO OF CASA DRAGONES TEQUILA

Career advice to those in your industry?

It doesn't matter if you’re a man going into a woman’s industry or a woman going into a man’s industry, have passion about your idea or brand, and you will inspire other people to have passion for it as well. And above all, have your vision clear and work towards it everyday.

PHIL HARRISON: PRESIDENT/CEO OF PERKINS+WILL

Career advice to those in your industry?

Focus on purpose. Ask “why” to yourself and your organization, and lead with these ideas in mind at all times.

ALEXA VON TOBEL: FOUNDER/CEO OF LEARNVEST.

Career advice to those in your industry?

Where to start? I once had someone tell me that if you knew what it took to build a company, you’d never start. It’s an incredibly consuming and exhilarating experience. Some of my favorite pieces of advice: make sure you’re 110% committed to your mission (this is what makes me so excited to get up every morning and work on LearnVest), stay focused (set clear goals and do not get distracted), and seek out smart feedback (find people who have gone before you and get their honest thoughts on your company).

PAUL J. D’ARCY: SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AT INDEED

Career advice to those in your industry?

Avoid complexity in your product or service: fight hard to keep things simple. Great things happen when you surround yourself with amazing people.

KENNETH D. MAKOVSKY: PRESIDENT, MAKOVSKY + COMPANY

Career advice to those in your industry?

For people who are new to the field, my advice is to be an information junkie and cultivate your curiosity.  Be aware of different aspects of what’s going on in society in order to increase your sensitivity to target audiences. Know that follow through is often the key to success. Another tip that has worked for me personally is that if you don’t succeed in an initiative, don’t allow yourself to feel defeated. Give yourself just one hour for depression, and then move on. Get busy!  Persistence has often solved more problems than the world would ever know.

NATHAN LUMP: EDITOR OF TRAVEL + LEISURE

Career advice to those in your industry?

First I think it’s essential to practice your craft—I’m a big advocate of learning by doing. Find outlets to work for, no matter how small or obscure or poorly funded, and get to work. I also think it’s critical to learn and stay up to date on the full range of media: today it’s all about being fluent in all platforms, from print to web to all the social channels to video. And it’s become so important to learn how you effectively market content—how do you get maximum exposure and promote your content to help it find an audience? I also always advise people to learn the business side of our business; being an editor or journalist today you need to understand what’s going on in marketing and advertising and the various ways content-driven brands are looking to identify new revenue streams. Editors and journalists who understand these things have an important edge in the job market today, I believe.

KATHY BLOOMGARDEN: CEO OF RUDER FINN 

Career advice to those in your industry?

 Believe that you can do anything you want. Don’t be afraid to take risks and think boldly. Dream big – and then go out there and do it, make it a reality.

SHAI RESHEF: FOUNDER, UNIVERSITY OF THE PEOPLE

Career advice to those in your industry?

The world can be changed. Do not fight change. Allow change to happen. Be a part of the change and make it positive. Build the world you would want for your children. Don’t get overwhelmed by everything it takes to make a real difference! Draw inspiration from those who work alongside you, be bold, come up with ideas and run with them. Breathe life into the projects you love, make sparks around them, find the right people to get involved. Never give up. Success is a marathon, but keep in mind that it happens one step at a time. When you give of yourself, you always get back much more than you’ve given.

  MICHAEL DOUGHERTY: CEO OF PENCILS OF PROMISE

Career advice to those in your industry?

Be fearless, act boldly and remain passionate and true to your goal. Since joining PoP almost a year ago I’ve come to see that we’ve had such positive outcomes and success because our staff is tenacious, bold and tirelessly committed to bringing our mission to life.

ROB FLAHERTY: CEO & PRESIDENT OF KETCHUM

Career advice to those in your industry?

It’s not about you.  Your success will be determined by how much you can rally others to the cause. Jack Welch said, "Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you became a leader, success is about growing others."  An entrepreneur often depends on themselves for too long – to solve every problem and sell their idea.  Success today is about conducting an orchestra, not playing first violin.

JOSÉ ANTONIO LLORENTE: FOUNDING & CHAIRMAN, LLORENTE & CUENCA

Career advice to those in your industry?

My advice is that companies have to be built based on what they want and promise to be, following the adage “Do what you say and say what you do.” Companies need to develop solid mechanisms of responsibility. Earning money and making a return for shareholders is no longer a sufficient, exclusive value to survive nowadays. Corporate Social Responsibility is now part of the core business management, and is steeped in the corporate culture. It is no longer enough to simply comply with legislation, but rather it is necessary to gain legitimacy.

SCOTT ALLISON: CHAIRMAN & CEO, ALLISON+PARTNERS

Career advice to those in your industry?

Know that you can build a lifelong career in the agency business. Many people think agencies are good starting points and that you should work at one early on in your career.  It doesn’t have to be like that.  We have many senior people here who have spent their entire careers at agencies and have flourished.

RALPH KATZ: CO-FOUNDER & PRINCIPAL OF COOPERKATZ & COMPANY

Career advice to those in your industry?

I have worked with many start-up entrepreneurs during the course of my career and I feel all of the successful ones that I have worked with had one trait in common – passion. In their heart and soul, they unshakably knew why they were taking the plunge to start a business and deal with all the risks, hours and endless decision-making that go with it. For some, they have conceived a better product or idea that they “must” bring to market; for others, it has been the desire to support an underserved or previously unrecognized cause in this world. For Andy and me, it was a conviction that we could develop a culture and atmosphere within our industry that both made it exciting to come to work every day and that facilitated top-notch client work. Whatever it is, the first step to success is being secure in the reason for your entrepreneurship. Without that, the sheer difficulty of starting from scratch and consistently performing at the level necessary to build something significant will overwhelm you.

VAL DIFEBO: CEO OF DEUTSCH NY

Career advice to those in your industry?

Aim high, surround yourself with people smarter than you are and be yourself. I grew up in a working class Italian family from the Bronx. I was a natural born leader and my first leadership opportunity was when I became student body president of my high school.

ALEXEI ORLOV: CEO OF RAPP: CORE DIALOG ™ WORLDWIDE

Career advice to those in your industry?

The communications/advertising industry is one of the most vibrant  and rewarding. But don’t, for one moment, think that it is in any way like the ‘Mad Men’ series — not, at least, if you’re working in a bonafide, serious place that wants to do great work for rewarding clients.

Here are three things I can absolutely say that anyone who wishes to advance their career, and become a well-respected, profitable leader, should pay attention to: Pick the subject you really love: creative, analytics, brand strategy, social media, whatever it is — and become a true expert in your field. Just being ‘very good’ is now simply being only mediocre, given the talent  that there is out there. You have to be known for progressing new thinking — and that comes from practice, learning and constant curiosity.

NICK EMERY: FOUNDER & CEO OF MINDSHARE

Career advice to those in your industry?

Follow our values – Speed, Teamwork and Provocation.

JOHN BOILER: FOUNDER/CEO OF 72ANDSUNNY

Career advice to those in your industry?

Don’t look down. Don’t look back.

RICK BARRACK: CCO & FOUNDING PARTNER OF CBX

Career advice to those in your industry?

My biggest piece of advice is to have perspective. In your endeavors, commit to what you’re passionate about, but be realistic. Open yourself up to learning (if you think you know everything, you’re not going to learn anything) and be prepared to course correct along the way. Understand your strengths and your weaknesses, and spend time learning how to leverage your strengths and improve your weaknesses.

ALAN SIEGEL: CEO OF SIEGELVISION

Career advice to those in your industry?

While there is no one person that has been my greatest influence in becoming a successful CEO, I learned by trial and error, noting some practices from clients that I worked with, interacting with professors at leading business schools and reading several invaluable books. Upon reflection, I think that my experience playing basketball in high school, attending college and serving in the Army each played a significant role in teaching me how to develop effective strategies, motivate and inspire a team, and help people with disappointments.

ADAM I. SANDOW: CHAIRMAN & CEO, SANDOW

Career advice to those in your industry?

You’ve got to find a powerful niche, where you can bring a unique solution or value proposition, and always remember unless you can do something incredibly unique, the world just doesn’t need another magazine, website or business. To be a successful entrepreneur you need to work harder than anyone else. I always believe that passion outweighs experience. When building a team, I would rather hire ten extraordinarily passionate people than ten industry veterans.

JEFF CHURCH: CO-FOUNDER/CEO OF SUJA JUICE

Career advice to those in your industry?

Opportunity is the meeting of preparation and luck. Startups are not easy- you shouldn’t just want to start a start up or be an entrepreneur for the sake of it. If you do, you likely won’t last or at the very least you won’t be happy. Being an entrepreneur means you are motivated to make the world a better place through something- a product, an experience etc. And you’re so motivated and believe so much in the concept that you are actually willing to dedicate your life to it for anywhere from a few years until, well, forever. So if you think you thrive in an entrepreneurial environment, my biggest piece of advice is to cultivate passion and opportunity. Follow the things you’re curious about, solve the things that cause you and those you care about the most pain. And be ready to see the right need all the way to being solved.

JONAS TÅHLIN: CEO OF ABSOLUT ELYX

Career advice to those in your industry?

Live and love the world where our brands are consumed. If you love the world, you will do well.

MATTHEW KENNEY: CELEBRITY CHEF

Career advice to those in your industry?

Many Matthew Kenney Culinary students want to become chefs or open plant-based restaurants, some are searching for their next step, and others are looking to change their lifestyle.  Chefs attend to enhance their existing training and bridge the gap between culinary art and nutrition.  

CHEF FRANK BONANNO: FOUNDER OF BONANNO CONCEPTS

Career advice to those in your industry?

My career advice to any person just starting out in any industry is this: keep your nose down, work super hard and learn something every day. There is always something to learn. You will never be the smartest person in the room. Work and work and learn and learn and suddenly, you’re too exhausted to have spent money and too smart to have talked disparagingly about the people around you, and if the person you’re in love with is the right person, they’ve been doing the same--so you’re both beat and sleeping well, you’ve learned a skillset that’s unparalleled, and there’s money in the bank and you’re ready for the next challenge.

OSCAR FARINETTI: FOUNDER OF EATALY

Career advice to those in your industry?

I can't give advice. Being a restaurateur is a really hard job. In order to do that, a big passion and good attitude, combined with numbers, of course, are required.

JEFFREY SMITH: PRESIDENT OF OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE

Career advice to those in your industry?

Be patient. Learn from everyone you work with. Try and make everyone around you the best they can be.  Treat people with respect and always keep your moral compass true north.

TERRY COUGHLIN: MANAGING PARTNER, USHG RESTAURANTS

Career advice to those in your industry?

Be willing to pay your dues.  Do not be in such a rush to “be the boss” that you do not take the time to learn how to lead.

JOHN BESH: OWNER, THE BESH RESTAURANT GROUP

Career advice to those in your industry?

Don't have a back up plan. If you have a back up plan you will be forever backing up. Be passionate about what you do and jump with both feet in. It takes that enthusiasm to be a winner.

ROCKY CIRINO: MANAGING DIRECTOR OF THE ALTAMAREA GROUP

Career advice to those in your industry?

The entire industry is founded on the desire to make people happy.  If you don’t enjoy making people happy, and figuring out how to do that with a variety of different circumstances every day, this business is not for you.  If this applies, then just remember to view every situation through that prism.  How can I make this moment special for this person?

J. PATRICK DOYLE: PRESIDENT & CEO OF DOMINO'S PIZZA

Career advice to those in your industry?

I spend most of my time making sure we’ve got the right people working for our company and as franchisees in our system.  I think great CEOs develop a compelling vision for why their business exists and how it is going to grow in the future.  If they do that right, they are able to attract the talent around them to make it happen.

DANA COWIN: FORMER EDITOR IN CHIEF, FOOD & WINE

Career advice to those in your industry?

Find a slice of a subject that you can own, that is authentically yours, something that no one else can cover in as compelling a way as you. That goes for everything from modernist technique to the foods of Soviet Georgia. Develop your skills for storytelling, and be sure that you learn to express yourself in every medium, from writing to photography to video, and experiment with all outlets from social media to print.

GERALD E. STARR​: CEO & CO-FOUNDER OF CLOUD9 TECHNOLOGIES

Career advice to those in your industry?

The career advice that I give everyone is that in business if you make 10 decisions, for example, you hope at least six are correct.  Then you take a look at the four that aren’t, and you go back and fix them.  It is okay to make a few mistakes along the way  - and how you address them counts.

CHRIS LARSEN: CO-FOUNDER AND CEO, RIPPLE LABS

Career advice to those in your industry?

Cut the life boats. When you decide to launch a company or idea, it requires your complete commitment to success. If you are always hedging and leaving yourself an “out” then you will not hit your mark.

MORGAN DOWNEY, CEO OF MONEY.NET

Career advice to those in your industry?

Stay focused on your customers, not competitors.

JON STEIN: FOUNDER/CEO OF BETTERMENT

Career advice to those in your industry?

Make it real as quickly as possible, do the things to build the minimum viable product, (print business cards, set up your email, get an office, etc.) build the thing that you're talking to people about. Don't just build a business plan, make it real so people can react to it and give you real feedback.

JESSICA TEVES: EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF STYLECASTER

Career advice to those in your industry?

In a nutshell: Be authentic. I love writers and editors that feel passionately about creating smart content—not just obsessed with the idea of being an editor. It’s hard work—especially in the Web world—so that passion is a key element.